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Sunday, June 16, 2013


Today is Father's Day and many families are
celebrating with their fathers.
They will get the food they love the most on this day.

Today, I want to honor my husband.
He is a wonderful father to our two sons.
I still remember the day that our son David was born.
It had to be an emergency C-section and several hours later,
I'm taken to my room.
The first thing I remember seeing is 
my husband in the yellow paper robe
holding David in his arms.  
Jorge had this huge smile on his face.
He was a dad!
The Lord blessed us again with another son, Chris.

Jorge taught our boys how to serve others.
He has taught them the meaning of sacrifice and honor
He taught them to respect others and protect the weak.
He taught them to have fun and enjoy life.

Jorge rarely missed a sporting event they participated in.
Whether it was basketball, soccer or baseball, he was there.
I still remember how he left a meeting from work so 
that he would not miss one of Chris's soccer games.

Jorge is a wonderful father and I hope that
one day when our sons have children of their own,
they will remember the godly example their father has been.

 Jorge and David in New Orleans helping after Hurricane Katrina

Doing their favorite activity:  shooting

 One happy and proud father

  Our wonderful family!

Friday, June 14, 2013



The first celebration of the U.S. Flag's birthday was held in 1877 on the 100th anniversary of the Flag Resolution of 1777. However, it is believed that the first annual recognition of the flag's birthday dates back to 1885 when school teacher, BJ Cigrand, first organized a group of Wisconsin school children to observe June 14 - the 108th anniversary of the official adoption of The Stars and Stripes as the Flag's Birthday. Cigrand, now known as the 'Father of Flag Day,' continued to publically advocate the observance of June 14 as the flag's 'birthday', or 'Flag Day' for years.
Just a few years later the efforts of another school teacher, George Balch, led to the formal observance of 'Flag Day' on June 14 by the New York State Board of Education. Over the following years as many as 36 state and local governments began adopted the annual observance. For over 30 years Flag Day remained a state and local celebration.

In 1916, the anniversary of the Flag Resolution of 1777 became a nationally observed event by a proclamation by President Woodrow Wilson. However, it was not designated as National Flag Day until August 3rd, 1949, when an Act of Congress designated June 14th of each year as National Flag Day.
Today, Flag Day is celebrated with parades, essay contests, ceremonies, and picnics sponsored by veterans' groups, schools, and groups like the National Flag Day foundation whose goal is to preserve the traditions, history, pride, and respect that are due the nation's symbol, Old Glory.

More Info:
The Stars and Stripes originated as a result of a resolution adopted by the Marine Committee of the Second Continental Congress at Philadelphia on June 14, 1777. The resolution read: "Resolved, that the flag of the United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field representing a new constellation. "

The resolution gave no instruction as to how many points the stars should have, nor how the stars should be arranged on the blue union. Consequently, some flags had stars scattered on the blue field without any specific design, some arranged the stars in rows, and some in a circle. The first Navy Stars and Stripes had the stars arranged in staggered formation in alternate rows of threes and twos on a blue field. Other Stars and Stripes flags had stars arranged in alternate rows of four, five and four. Some stars had six points while others had eight.

Strong evidence indicates that Francis Hopkinson of New Jersey, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, was responsible for the stars in the U.S. flag. At the time that the flag resolution was adopted, Hopkinson was the Chairman of the Continental Navy Board's Middle Department. Hopkinson also helped design other devices for the Government including the Great Seal of the United States. For his services, Hopkinson submitted a letter to the Continental Admiralty Board asking "whether a Quarter Cask of the public Wine will not be a proper & reasonable Reward for these Labours of Fancy and a suitable Encouragement to future Exertions of a like Nature." His request was turned down since the Congress regarded him as a public servant.

Flag Etiquette Do's and Don'ts

The U.S. Flag Code formalizes and unifies the traditional ways in which we give respect to the flag, also contains specific instructions on how the flag is not to be used.
The following is a list of do’s and don’ts associated with Old Glory, the U.S. Flag.
When displaying the flag, DO the following:
    • Display the U.S. flag from sunrise to sunset on buildings and stationary flagstaffs in the open. When a patriotic effect is desired the flag may be displayed 24-hours a day if properly illuminated during the hours of darkness.
    • When placed on a single staff or lanyard, place the U.S. Flag above all other flags.
    • When flags are displayed in a row, the U.S. flag goes to the observer’s left. Flags of other nations are flown at same height. State and local flags are traditionally flown lower.
    • When used during a marching ceremony or parade with other flags, the U.S. Flag will be to the observer’s left.
    • On special days, the flag may be flown at half-staff. On Memorial Day it is flown at half-staff until noon and then raised.
    • When flown at half-staff, should be first hoisted to the peak for an instant and then lowered to the half-staff position. The flag should be again raised to the peak before it is lowered for the day. By "half-staff" is meant lowering the flag to one-half the distance between the top and bottom of the staff. Crepe streamers may be affixed to spear heads or flagstaffs in a parade only by order of the President of the United States.
    • When the flag is displayed over the middle of the street, it should be suspended vertically with the union (blue field of stars) to the north in an east and west street or to the east in a north and south street.
    • When the flag is displayed in a manner other than by being flown from a staff, it should be displayed flat, whether indoors or out. When displayed either horizontally or vertically against a wall, the union (blue field of stars) should be uppermost and to the flag's own right, that is, to the observer's left. When displayed in a window it should be displayed in the same way -- with the union or blue field to the left of the observer in the street.
    • When the flag is displayed on a car, the staff shall be fixed firmly to the chassis or clamped to the right fender.
    • When the flag is used to cover a casket, it should be so placed that the union is at the head and over the left shoulder. The flag should not be lowered into the grave or allowed to touch the ground.
When saluting the flag DO the following:
    • All persons present in uniform (military, police, fire, etc.) should render the military salute. Members of the armed forces and veterans who are present but not in uniform may render the military salute.
    • All other persons present should face the flag and stand at attention with their right hand over the heart, or if applicable, remove their headdress with their right hand and hold it at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart.
When stowing or disposing of the flag, DO the following:
    • Fold in the traditional triangle for stowage, never wadded up.
    • The VFW offers the following instructions for properly disposing of a worn flag:
      • The flag should be folded in its customary manner.
      • It is important that the fire be fairly large and of sufficient intensity to ensure complete burning of the flag.
      • Place the flag on the fire.
      • The individual(s) can come to attention, salute the flag, recite the Pledge of Allegiance and have a brief period of silent reflection.
      • After the flag is completely consumed, the fire should then be safely extinguished and the ashes buried.
      • Please make sure you are conforming to local/state fire codes or ordinances.
Quick list of Flag Etiquette Dont's:
    • Don’t dip the U.S. Flag for any person, flag, or vessel.
    • Don’t let the flag touch the ground.
    • Don’t fly flag upside down unless there is an emergency.
    • Don’t carry the flag flat, or carry things in it.
    • Don’t use the flag as clothing.
    • Don’t store the flag where it can get dirty.
    • Don’t use it as a cover.
    • Don’t fasten it or tie it back. Always allow it to fall free.
    • Don’t draw on, or otherwise mark the flag.
    • Don’t use the flag for decoration. Use bunting with the blue on top, then white, then red.

How to Retire Your Flag

We raised our flags September 11, 2001 and flew them proudly. Our flags stand tall as we leave our mark on foreign soil. Each year, Americans across the nation unfurl their flags on Independence Day, Memorial Day, and Flag Day. For some, the Stars and Stripes decorates their porches all year as a daily reminder of what it means to be an American.
But what do we do when our flags become tattered and torn, and can fly no longer?
There is a justified reason and dignified way of burning the flag when the time has come for Old Glory.
The Council for Okinawa Protection and Police Services (C.O.P.P.S.) did just that when they retired Old Glory in fiery fashion during a flag retirement ceremony on Flag Day.
"U.S. Flag Code 1 simply reads: 'The flag, when it is in such a condition that it is no longer a fitting emblem for display, should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning,'" said Les Donoho of Boy Scout Pack 133, who participated in the ceremony.
Lt. Col. Kevan Kvenlog, Provost Marshal, Marine Corps Base, opened the ceremony by discussing the tradition of retiring the flag, the conditions for the retirement and expressed his gratitude to those in attendance.

After opening comments, one representative from each military branch held a corner of Old Glory, the post flag flown over Building 1, as it was inspected by 2nd Lt. Leroy Corte-Real, district officer in charge, central district provost marshal's office, Camp Foster.

Corte-Real reported to Kvenlog that the flag had been found unserviceable and unsuitable to be displayed. Kvenlog then gave the order for the retirement of the flag to commence. The four Servicemembers carried it to a burn barrel, lit it on fire and saluted the flag one last time.

Following the retirement of the Building 1 post flag, members of local Boy Scout packs and Girl Scout troops brought forward other tattered flags to be disposed of properly. Along with Boy Scout and Girl Scout representatives in attendance, some junior enlisted Marines made their way out to observe the occasion for the first time.

"I've never been to a flag retirement ceremony and I wanted to pay respects to my flag," said Lance Cpl. Christopher Jose, multi-channel equipment repairman, Marine Wing Communication Squadron 18, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing. According to Kvenlog, having representatives from the four military services and local law enforcement agencies in attendance displayed the working cooperation between each. He said the ceremony was the first for C.O.P.P.S. and it was sponsored by all law enforcement agencies on the island.
"We held this ceremony for public service and to show honor to the flag," Kvenlog said. "It was an opportunity to show the four services and local agencies working together." He said it was also a way of letting people know what to do if they have old, unserviceable flags to be disposed of.

Information for the above article was obtained from Military website.

Tuesday, June 11, 2013


Last year I decided to put all of my irises in one bed.
So off I went digging them up and dividing them up.
I love irises because they come in so many varieties.
Here's what I did in dividing my irises.

Choose the rhizomes you wish to replant
from what you dug up and separated.

Loosen the dirt

Sprinkle bone meal and mix it into the soil.